Share with Wildlife

    • New: The list of Share with Wildlife projects to be funded in 2022 has been released and is available for viewing on the Applications-Reports tab. The call for proposals for 2023 projects will be released in spring, 2022.
    • New: Use the Wildlife Artwork form available on MVD’s website to order a Share with Wildlife license plate. See the “Donate Now!” tab for more information.

    Share with Wildlife

    Share with Wildlife is a New Mexico Department of Game and Fish program initiated in 1981 that depends on tax-deductible donations from the public. Its mission is to help those species that do not receive funding from any other source. The program funds four categories of wildlife projects: research, education, habitat enhancement, and rehabilitation. It receives much of its funding through the state income tax check-off program. It is also supported through Share with Wildlife license plate sales and direct donations. Matching federal funds maximize the program’s support of New Mexico’s wildlife. (Video still: Broad-billed hummingbird artwork above by Hira Walker).

    What kind of projects does Share with Wildlife support and how can you support Share with Wildlife? Watch the above introductory video or the below interview with Ginny Seamster, Share with Wildlife Coordinator (click below).

    We are here with Ginny Seamster, Share with Wildlife Coordinator.

    Project Highlights

    Project Highlight: Counting Bats and Learning About Their Diet and Movements

    Share with Wildlife Project Highlight NMDGF: Counting Bats and Learning About Their Diet and Movements

    Retrieving long-nosed bats from net. (Ginny Seamster)

    How many long-nosed bats use one of the few confirmed roosts for these bats in New Mexico? Where do these bats go once they leave the roost? What do these migratory bats feed on when they are in New Mexico? These are some of the questions that Mallory Davies, a graduate student at Colorado State University, working in the lab of her advisor, Dr. Kathryn Stoner, is trying to answer when it comes to the lesser long-nosed and Mexican long-nosed bat.

    The lesser long-nosed bat has been removed from the Endangered Species Act and has to be monitored to track its status and ensure that removal of this species from the list of federally threatened and endangered species remains warranted. The Mexican long-nosed bat is still on this list. These bats migrate to New Mexico from Mexico for the summer. They are known to feed on nectar from agave flowers in New Mexico, but other dietary information is valuable given the comparatively short period of time that flowering food resources are available annually and the fact that agaves only flower once during their life, making it difficult to know how many agaves may flower each year. Mallory and her field technicians set a plastic sheet at the entrance to the roost and collect guano deposited by bats as they leave the roost. The guano can be analyzed both using microscopes and genetic techniques to determine what the bats are eating, other than nectar from agaves.

    Share with Wildlife Project Highlight NMDGF: Counting Bats and Learning About Their Diet and Movements

    Lesser long-nosed bat. (Ginny Seamster)

    Share with Wildlife Project Highlight NMDGF: Counting Bats and Learning About Their Diet and Movements

    Checking age of bat. (Ginny Seamster)

     
    Share with Wildlife Project Highlight NMDGF: Counting Bats and Learning About Their Diet and Movements

    Measuring lesser long-nosed bat forearm. (Ginny Seamster)

    Share with Wildlife Project Highlight NMDGF: Counting Bats and Learning About Their Diet and Movements

    Feeding bat sugar water prior to release. (Ginny Seamster)

     

    An important component of evaluating the status of the lesser long-nosed bat, with respect to its having been removed from the federal list of threatened and endangered species, is assessing how many bats are using confirmed roosts. It is also helpful to know how far the bats travel and how long they may stay at any given roost. Mallory and Dr. Stoner are using cameras that allow them to detect bats at night (i.e., thermal imaging cameras) to count bats leaving the focal roost for their study and are using mist nets to capture some of those bats and insert PIT tags. These tags can be detected with a handheld reader and with an antenna. Antennae have been set up not only at the Stoner lab study site but at other roosts in Arizona and Mexico, allowing for assessment of whether bats are moving between roosts and how many nights a given bat stays at a single roost.

    Share with Wildlife Project Highlight NMDGF: Counting Bats and Learning About Their Diet and Movements

    Back entrance to roost. (Ginny Seamster)

    Mallory and her field technicians have a very long field season, arriving in New Mexico in May and leaving in October. They hike up to the roost once every week or so to catch bats, collect guano, and check on the camera and other monitoring devices. The hike is hot and strenuous, especially when carrying all the required gear for a night in the field! When not at the roost, they gather data on when agaves are flowering within a 50 km radius of the roost (bats can travel up to 100 km in one night to forage!). They also search for other roosts in southwestern New Mexico and place cameras and acoustic detectors at agaves to determine whether bats are foraging at particular agave patches. There are many hours of video from the camera at the roost to evaluate to determine weekly population counts for the roost and sound recordings that they will be analyzing to assess the total number of species using the roost. A final report from 2021 data collection will be submitted in early summer, 2022.

     

    Recent Highlights

    2020 Highlights

    2019 Highlights

    2018 Highlights

    2017 Highlights

    2016 Highlights

    2015 Highlights

    Call for 2023 Projects

    The Call for 2023 Projects will be released in March, 2022. Contact the Share with Wildlife program coordinator, Ginny Seamster (virginia.seamster@state.nm.us), with questions in the meantime.

    2022 Share with Wildlife Projects

    Category Title
    Research Population genomics of Pecos pupfish – Katie Zarn
    Research Assessing the effects of forest management and wildfire on populations of New Mexico’s endemic salamanders – Nancy Karraker
    Research Post-wildfire habitat use by the Peñasco least chipmunk – Jennifer Frey
    Research Identifying habitat usage by New Mexico populations of Rio Grande chub and Rio Grande sucker and its effect on presence and relative abundance of both species – American Southwest Ichthyological Researchers, LLC
    Research  Pinyon jay surveys in the Gila National Forest – Kristine Johnson
    Education New Mexico wildlife wonders: A 2nd grade lesson module – Asombro Institute for Science Education
    Education The Bosque Education Guide and New Mexico STEM Ready! Science Standards – Friends of the Rio Grande Nature Center
    Education Wildlife and wildland fire interactions in the southwest – Environmental Education Association of New Mexico
    Education Engaging future conservation leaders: Audubon’s Outdoor Field Science Program – Audubon Southwest
    Education Snake country survival guide – Advocates for Snake Preservation
    Rehabilitation / Education Wildlife rehabilitation/Connecting students to wildlife and habitats in New Mexico – New Mexico Wildlife Center
    Rehabilitation Desert Willow Wildlife Rehabilitation Center

     

    Forms for Share with Wildlife Contractors

    These forms are provided for informational purposes to individuals and organizations submitting a proposal to the Share with Wildlife program in response to an active Call For Project Information. These forms should not be submitted to the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish unless an employee of the Department directly contacts you and requests that you fill them out as part of the process of implementing a professional services contract for a new Share with Wildlife project.

    Campaign Contribution Disclosure Form

    Compliance with Government Conduct Act

    DFA Agency Certification Form

    Substitute Form W-9

    Scientific Collection and Education Permit Application

    Applicants for a Share with Wildlife project who intend to capture and handle animals or use live animals and/or animal parts for educational purposes for their project may need to obtain a scientific collection permit or educational program permit from the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. Please see the Special Use Permits page for more information and contact dgf.permits@state.nm.us with questions.

    Highlighted Curriculum

    The Sandia Mountain Natural History Center developed a curriculum in 2020 that focuses on several Species of Greatest Conservation Need in New Mexico. The curriculum was developed with the support of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish’s Share with Wildlife program. The lessons in the curriculum can be implemented remotely if needed and address several New Mexico STEM Ready! Science Standards for middle school students.

    Reports

    To access other project reports, please visit the Share with Wildlife search on the BISON-M website:
    http://bison-m.org/contractsearch.aspx.

    Donations

    New Mexico wildlife needs your help! Share with Wildlife funds numerous projects related to wildlife habitat enhancement, wildlife-related education, wildlife rehabilitation, and research on wildlife biology and ecology every year. All projects are made possible through donations made by members of the public. 

    To make a donation, you may donate part of the refund on your state tax return; purchase a Share with Wildlife license plate; make any dollar amount donation online (minimum $2; see more information below); or mail in a check using this donation form. All donated funds go to supporting wildlife; none are used for administrative costs.

    If you want your dollars to go even further in supporting non-game wildlife, consider donating to Share with Wildlife and purchasing a Habitat Management Access Validation simultaneously. Click here for more information about donating and here for information on our State Game Commission Lands.

    Donations made to the Share with Wildlife program are tax-deductible for both federal and New Mexico state taxes. Please see U.S. Code Title 26. Internal Revenue Code – section 170c – Charitable Contribution Defined for more information. You may wish to further confirm with your tax advisor/preparer.

    Thank you for your support of New Mexico’s wildlife!

    Icon of Share with Wildlife - Donation Form (Word) Share with Wildlife - Donation Form (Word) Icon of Share with Wildlife - Donation Form (PDF) Share with Wildlife - Donation Form (PDF)

    New Mexico Wildlife License Plate

    Road Runner - Support wildlife by ordering the New Mexico Wildlife License Plate

    Support wildlife by ordering the New Mexico Wildlife License Plate

    Support wildlife by ordering the New Mexico Wildlife License Plate

    Support wildlife by ordering the New Mexico Wildlife License Plate - Elk

    Download the PDF to support wildlife by ordering the Share with Wildlife license plate. PDF made available from MVD New Mexico. The roadrunner and Rio Grande cutthroat trout plates are only available through the mail. The roadrunner plate was released by MVD October 19th, 2020. It may take several weeks (6-10 or more) to receive your roadrunner or trout plate from MVD.

    Donate Online 

    You can donate to Share with Wildlife through your Online Licensing System account by clicking Customer Login located at the top of this website:

    conservation-share-with-wildlife-donation-online-how-to-step-1

    On the Online Licensing System website (shown below) please enter your Username (or Customer ID or Email) and Password, and then click the Login button:

    conservation-share-with-wildlife-donation-online-how-to-step-2

    Once you are logged in, if you only wish to donate to Share with Wildlife, click on the Share with Wildlife button on the home page:

    Type any dollar amount (minimum $2.00) you wish to donate in the Enter Donation Amount box (shown below) and click Review Order:

    Dismiss any pop-up windows (shown below) regarding purchasing other items by clicking the OK button:

    Click the Add to Cart button (shown below) at the top of the Review Order page:

    On the next screen, click Checkout and continue on to complete your purchase.

    OR

    Once you are logged in, if you are purchasing other items through the Online Licensing System, go to License Sales | General License Sales from the Main Menu (shown below):

    After you read the Terms of Agreement on the next page and click the Continue button, you will see a list of Available Products. Locate the Share with Wildlife Donation product ($10 donation only) OR the Share with Wildlife Extra Donation product ($2.00 minimum donation; type dollar amount in Enter Donation Amount box) and click the check box next to (add to order). Click the Review Order button:

    Dismiss any pop-up windows (shown above) regarding purchasing other items by clicking the OK button. Click the Add to Cart button (shown above) at the top of the Review Order page. On the next screen, click Checkout and continue on to complete your purchase.